The Perfect Place

I recently read a post on Facebook, from someone experiencing some extremes of weather - and perhaps some loneliness - saying that she needed to find "the perfect place." This, understandably, would be one with no tornadoes, no snow, no hurricanes, no.... Well, you get the picture.

My guess is that many of us have had similar thoughts from time to time. For me, it's in the peak allergy season, when it seems I am under attack by the entire plant world. The details of the weather, however, don't bother me much, for reasons you may understand later.


But the statement got me to thinking. What is the "perfect" place?

I grew up in Colorado, in and near the mountains. We had horses and cows. In high school, I worked on ranches in Colorado and Wyoming, and one summer, at the county rodeo grounds. I was living in heaven, and had no interest in "seeing the world." After all, how much better could it be?

Then I joined the Air Force, and began to see the "less fortunate" parts of the world. I spent time in various parts of the U.S., including the Great Lakes, the Southwest, the West Coast, the South, and more. I saw a lot. And I also spent time in Asia and Europe.

So I consider myself somewhat qualified to talk about "the perfect place."

I think of my experience in this wide variety of places, some with lots of snow, others with no snow. Some had hurricanes, others, tornadoes, and all in all, perhaps every sort of weather on record. (I find it ironic that weather and climate play such a large role in answering this question. I was a weather guy: These things were my business.) And I notice that the weather had nothing to do with my enjoyment of the place.

I spent time in a place with 190 inches of snow a year. I enjoyed it a lot. I spent time where the temperature often topped 100 degrees, and dust storms were not uncommon. Again, I had a great time. I spent time on an island - a sandbar, really - in the Gulf of Mexico. It was a hurricane target. I enjoyed that, as well.

Now I'm in Saint Louis, and have been for nearly 5 difficult years. But I was here before, and the years were not difficult. What's the difference?

I have concluded that the perfect place is one where I can follow and serve God, being a channel of his grace and truth, and where I can enjoy the presence of important relationships in my life.

It doesn't matter if I'm on a tropical island far from anywhere, in a remote town in snow country, or in a major city. What matters is why I'm there, and what I'm doing there. Am I there because God sent me? Am I doing something that matters, something that honors God? Am I in growing, loving relationships with God and others?

If I am, if I can answer yes to these questions, then I am in the perfect place, or as close as I can get in this life. And I am to be envied.

4 Comments

The perfect place is true. I only wonder if the human mind can handle the perfect place? Thanks to our Creator, God Almighty and His beloved Son, Jesus abiding in His Holy Spirit for giving us the ability to require more than a naturl experience. Only in the spiritual you can visit the perfect place. Wow, I must mention it is beautiful.

Hello Mason,

Thanks for your comment. It seems to me that you make a separation between "natural" and "spiritual" worlds, and hold that the "spiritual" world is superior. Is that what you are saying?

a human's mind belives (biased)with what has seen when he was child hood. don't think things are true only in your belif

Hello Toffa. Thanks for your comment. You make a good point: We often believe what we have been raised to believe, and the fact that we believe something doesn't make it true. We should check our beliefs against something besides our own past. Is there evidence? Is my belief objectively true, or is there something that the evidence supports better?

I believe there is solid evidence in support of the truth of Christianity, and that's why I am a Christian. Only Christianity stands up to careful examination.

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  • Larry Baden said:
      Hello Toffa. Thanks for your comment. You make a good point: We often ...
  • toffa said:
      a human's mind belives (biased)with what has seen when he was child h...
  • Larry Baden said:
      Hello Mason, Thanks for your comment. It seems to me that you make a ...
  • Mason J said:
      The perfect place is true. I only wonder if the human mind can handle...

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